Four Simple Ways (You Can Help…)

Many friends have asked how they can help with the work that the LIV Foundation has set out to do. The fact is that the opportunities are too innumerable to list them all. Remember our mission is to provide assistance for the families of children who live with life-altering illness so they can focus on living their lives and loving their children unconditionally. Meanwhile, many estimate about 15% to 18% of children in the United States live with a chronic health condition.

The mission is challenging but not overwhelming because we know that the families on the journey of care need help and are appreciative of any assistance, any act of kindness that can help their families.

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Here are the four simple ways you can help…

Number 1: Contribute to the LIV Beautifully @ CHOP Campaign. Help us help the CHOP Salon Services Team deliver some “Swag” over the holidays! You can do so by visiting us at http://www.thelivfoundation.org/events.html

 

Number 2: Like and share our blog and social media posts like this one. Therein we typically focus on providing information and resources intended to help families on the journey of care. This simple action may help a family in need connect with us.

 

Number 3: Check out the vendor links within our blog posts (Shop on Amazon and Help Families and Friends of CHOP).  If you shop at Amazon, Blue Apron and other online vendors you can help us by clicking on the links embedded in our blog posts.  We have established affiliate vendor agreements with several organizations and a small percentage of your purchase will go directly to the families that The LIV Foundation Serves. Alternatively, you can use AmazonSmile (https://smile.amazon.com/) is a website operated by Amazon with the same products, prices, and shopping features as Amazon.com. The difference is that when you shop on AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price of eligible products to the charitable organization of your choice.

 

Number 4: If you or someone you know is on the journey of care, you would like to support our mission in some other way, or if you have questions reach out to us at thelivfoundation@gmail.com

 

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/   or email at tommynieman@gmail.com

 

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

 

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

15 Dos and Don’ts for Helping a Friend With a Sick Child in the Hospital https://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-karin-l-smithson/conscious-relationships_b_4350876.html

How to Help a Friend Who’s Dealing With a Very Sick Child https://www.popsugar.com/moms/How-Help-Friend-Sick-Child-43084107

 

Chemo Related Hair Loss and the Proactivity Paradox

Per information published on the Mayo Clinic Web Site, chemotherapy may cause hair loss all over your body. In addition to hair loss on the scalp, sometimes eyelashes, eyebrows and other body hair also falls out. Some chemotherapy drugs are more likely than others to cause hair loss, and different doses can cause anything from a mere thinning to complete baldness. Hair is lost when chemotherapy drugs damage hair follicles, making hair fall out. According to the American Cancer Society, “it can be hard to predict which patients will lose their hair and which ones won’t, even when they take the same drugs.”

There are many Non-Oncology (Non-Cancer Related) conditions that can be treated by Chemotherapy including some Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammatory Conditions. Despite the severity and power of these drugs they often are prescribed in pediatric treatment regimen for childhood disease that can be treated effectively with Chemotherapy.  The symptoms are the similar to that which you will see in adults undergoing Chemotherapy including: Nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain, muscle achiness, decreased appetite, decrease in blood cell counts, dizziness, darkened skin coloration, ringing in ears and hearing loss, kidney damage, rash and increased breathing effort, diarrhea or constipation, abdominal cramping, weakness, loss of reflexes and several other difficult symptoms. As you would imagine the difficulty of navigating these symptoms in children is, in many ways, more difficult than doing so with an adult patient.

Adding to the stress related to treatment is the impact of post treatment immunosuppression.  This occurs in chemotherapy patients and it makes them very susceptible to other ailments including colds, influenza, bronchitis and many others. Despite all of these complications, one of the least physically painful side effects, hair loss, can be among the most challenging to cope with.

In A Guide for Parents, Published by National Cancer Institute, it is suggested that it could be beneficial to take proactive steps to prepare for hair loss. Furthermore, if treatment is expected to cause a child’s hair to fall out, it may be helpful to let child pick out a fun cap, scarf, and/or wig ahead of time. Some have reported that it is best to pick out a wig before the hair falls out, so you can match it to their hair color. Sometimes cutting your child’s hair short before treatment helps make hair loss a bit less upsetting, in part because they have some control over the process and it happens all at once instead of falling out over a drawn out progression throughout the post treatment phase.

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For many patients undergoing treatment who experience hair loss, it is difficult to shake the cultural and personal attachment to their hair. However, in some cases it has been reported that the loss of hair, when dealt with in a positive, proactive manner can be an empowering event that buoys the patient’s spirit and conviction toward progress on the journey of care. In some cases the event can bolster a patient’s self-esteem by helping them realize the beauty they possess beyond the physical vessel of their body and all of its parts. Often the attachment we give to individual physical traits such as “beautiful flowing hair” can actually limit us and our self-image by depending too heavily on that one physical trait to bolster self-esteem. When such a gift is taken from us it can trigger a mourning period and even depression. Alternatively when given or shed proactively we can receive positive energy as a result of controlling an otherwise uncontrollable situation.

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/ or email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

A Guide for Parents – National Cancer Institute: https://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/children-with-cancer.pdf

CancerCare: https://www.cancercare.org/publications/287-hair_loss_during_treatment_finding_resources_and_support

The Power of Listening – One Thing You Can Do For A Family Who Has A Sick Child Even If You Have No Money, Resources or Extra Time

You may have lived through the gut wrenching experience of observing family or friends who have found themselves caring for a child with a life altering illness. Some say parents who go through the journey of care with their sick child, endure pain that rivals that of absorbing knockout blows from a heavyweight fighter.

First, there is the diagnosis, then overwhelming emotions accompanying the realization of the magnitude of the situation. Many parents develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic anxiety and even depression. All too often the impact is devastating — health, financial and relational impacts are frequently astonishing.

There was a time, not too long ago, when several colleagues and friends were on the journey of care at the same time when we learned of a family member who was diagnosed with a genetic disorder that would require treatments over a prolonged period of time. Then, yet another friend learned that his young adult son needed treatment too.  The feeling of helplessness among many in our circle of friends and family, who watched with great hope of recovery and who longed for a return to how things were pre-diagnosis, was palpable.

The daily battle these parents endured from our vantage point was immense. Whether reporting to work at 8am on a Monday after a weekend of travel and treatments at a region hospital; driving home from a second job at 2am on a Saturday Morning to wake up and resume arguing with an insurance provider over an invoice; watching their young child endure the harshness of chemotherapy treatments; or any of the other hurdles on the gauntlet known as the journey of care; the trials are immensely strenuous in every dimension of life.

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The parents often serve as a source of inspiration for those around them but we, at times, were left with a feeling of helplessness due to our inability to support them in any meaningful way. Introspection, prayer and research all brought no answers commensurate with the challenge of adequately supporting these folks.  Then a trend emerged seemingly out of nowhere…  In a few instances it was mentioned that we wished we could do more to help and the parents expressed appreciation for how we took time to listen to them.

Yes the simple act of sincerely listening to them, letting them speak about anything they wished and just offering our time and attention made a difference for them. They felt heard as opposed to spoken to by experts. They felt cared for, with no strings attached, instead of directed and consulted. This still perplexes me but I am grateful to have been able to help. I certainly wish we could have done more at the time but am grateful to learn that seemingly all are able to help these people who desperately need to be heard.

They don’t need pity, solutions, suggestions or charity – like many among us they just need to be heard and feel as though they are understood. The simple act of listening, some reported, helped strengthen their resolve to carry on and continue to find ways to live their life and care for their child while on the often treacherous journey of care.

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/ or email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

What To Say When a Friend’s Child Is Sick https://redefinedmom.com/what-to-say-when-a-friends-child-is-sick/

15 Dos and Don’ts for Helping a Friend With a Sick Child in the Hospital https://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-karin-l-smithson/conscious-relationships_b_4350876.html

How to Help a Friend Who’s Dealing With a Very Sick Child  https://www.popsugar.com/moms/How-Help-Friend-Sick-Child-43084107

Money, Money, Money

Money or lack thereof, is not a barrier to finding therapy support for you and your family while caring for your family member who is chronically ill. Here are some ideas we found that may help you stretch your therapy treatment dollars…

Look for inexpensive options.

Counselors in training have to put in a minimum amount of treatment hours before earning their license, which means they sometimes offer sessions at a discount while being overseen by a licensed therapist. The same goes for students, supervised by a clinician,  at the master’s and Ph.D. level. Some report that after becoming licensed many counselors will keep their clients at a discounted rate as a form of loyalty.

Frequency and format are also places to get creative and have an impact on price. Instead of going every week, you can talk about going once a month, or switching your sessions to Skype and/or email. Today, online therapy services like BetterHelp, 7 Cups of Tea, BlahTherapy and Talkspace are reported to be effective and inexpensive alternatives for many. In many cases you can ask them to work on a payment plan.

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One frequently overlooked source for affordable assistance is your employer.  A growing number of employers offer Employee Assistance Programs (E.A.P.) benefits, which provide low cost or free, short-term care options for employees who need help from a trained psychologist, social worker or therapist when confronted with circumstances that create emotional stress.  If you are not sure whether your employer offers this type of benefit, ask your manager or your human resources contact.

The bottom line…

Self-care as a parent caring for a child with chronic or life-altering illness is a critical component of successfully navigating the journey of care. In our blog post from September 26th entitled Quiet Warrior Next Door: 5 things you may not know about your friend or family member who cares for a chronically ill child, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), burnout, marital strife, home and job loss were noted as frequent outcomes found in situations when families are on this journey. If you are on the journey of care there is no reason not to get help. The aid of a qualified, competent therapist can help you care for your family, remain productive at work and even help you take care of yourself — So you can in turn care more effectively for your family.

If you are new to the journey of care you may feel relieved to know that there are some very reasonably prices solutions you can fit into your budget. No matter how stretched you are financially you can find effective emotional support for you and your family.

In the next installment of this four part series we will summarize some of the key ideas we shared related to family therapy and support.

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/ or email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

References used for this blog post:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freudian-sip/201102/how-find-the-best-therapist-you

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/choose-therapist.aspx

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/how-to-find-therapist#1

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/smarter-living/how-to-find-the-right-therapist.html?mcubz=3

https://www.thespruce.com/when-do-i-need-family-counselor-1270709

Help!  I need Somebody! Help…!

This is the second installment of a four part series. In the first post we covered some ideas related to how families can begin exploring ways to get help and how to know when professional help is needed. In this issue we will explore some strategies that can help ensure you find the right the right therapist to help you and your family given your specific needs.

How do we find the right counselor or therapist for us?

Among the best places to start is within your current circle of family, friends and caregivers.  Ask friends who you know are in therapy if they like their therapist.  In her 2017 New York Times article, How to Find the Right Therapist, Marissa Miller suggested that If they do, find out what qualities they like about them and ask your friends to ask their therapists for referral lists.

She went on to suggest that find a psychologist, ask your physician or another health professional. Call your local or state psychological association. Consult a local university or college department of psychology. Ask family and friends. Contact your area community mental health center. Inquire at your church or synagogue. Or, use APA’s Psychologist Locator service.

Jane Ryan, co-founder of Ryan Therapy Services, based in Tacoma Washington, explained that there are some major sites that help clients find therapists in their area. The biggest one is Psychology Today. You simply put your zip code in and the therapists in your area come up. If you are looking for a therapist who specializes in a specific issue or problem or works with teens or the elderly, or couples, you can also put that in the search.  Jane suggests another simple search that many overlook. Simply plug search commands into google — something like, “therapists who specialize in… located in…”

Then you can view therapists’ websites and read in detail about their work. Jane believes any therapist worth going to will be open to a brief phone conversation during which the client can “interview” them or a session that allows the client to meet the therapist in person and ask questions to see if the match is good. Many therapists offer a short session (30 minutes) as an “interview” without charge; others offer a full session.

Another reoccurring concept that surfaced while researching this topic is the idea of looking for chemistry. Treat your first appointment like a job interview. Before making your first call, look at a therapist’s online presence on Yelp-like databases like Vitals, ZocDoc and Healthgrades. Don’t forget to do a quick scan of social media too! There will be some clues based on publicly available information that may help you determine who you might enjoy working with.

As you begin to interact with your counseling candidates ask yourself questions that will help you discern whether or not you can have a productive long-term relationship with them. Ask questions like:

Do I feel comfortable with this person? Do they really list to me? Is he or she asking enough questions? Has the therapist asked about your goals– how you want your life to be? Do you feel satisfied with the counselor’s resources? Do you feel comfortable with their level of knowledge and understanding in your areas of need? Does what the therapist says make sense to you and the rest of your family? Does it help you or not?

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One way to save time and work efficiently is to conduct your initial interview with the therapist candidates on the phone for a few minutes and ask what he or she enjoys most about counseling. Ask what school the therapist attended, ensuring proper accreditation as opposed to an online certificate. Ask about specialties, noting how comfortable the response is when you share your issue. Ask about licenses and look them up to be sure the therapist hasn’t incurred any infractions (this information is available at state licensing boards like this one in Pennsylvania). Finally, has the therapist ever attended therapy? Some suggest that it is important to work with a therapist who has actually worked through issues with a therapist. This is important for several reasons, one of which is this ensures they understand the needs of a therapy client, first-hand.

In the next installment we will explore ways to manage costs related to family therapy and support.  If you are new to the journey of care you may feel relieved to know that there are some very reasonably prices solutions you can fit into your budget. No matter how stretched you are financially you can find effective emotional support for you and your family.

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/

or on email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

References used for this blog post:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freudian-sip/201102/how-find-the-best-therapist-you

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/choose-therapist.aspx

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/how-to-find-therapist#1

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/smarter-living/how-to-find-the-right-therapist.html?mcubz=3

https://www.thespruce.com/when-do-i-need-family-counselor-1270709

Like a Bridge Over Troubled Water

When and how to start your search for a therapist for you and your family when on the journey of care.

How can I start to explore ways to get help for my family?

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When you start your child’s treatment journey the direct care team likely will be your first and best source of information and support, but there are other resources for help when you need it. Support services are a critically important part of your child’s care because they help to fortify the holistic elements of care for your sick child and your whole family. These resources might include nursing services, financial aid, nutritional advice, rehab, and/or spiritual help. Several families who have lived the treatment journey and several healthcare professionals have explained that often the best way to start your exploration of these resources is through the social work team assigned to you and your child at the hospital where the diagnosis was made and/or where initial treatment ensued. The Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care, at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for example, is staffed by nearly 100 masters-trained social workers. They provide services to families during inpatient hospitalizations, when visiting an outpatient office or clinic, and even after a child returns home after treatment.

Support groups and organizations like The American Cancer Society also have programs and services – including lodging, support groups, and more – to help your child get through treatment. They also can serve as a good referral source for ideas related to therapy options and emotional support.

How do I know when we need professional help?

Deciding if marriage and family therapy is right for a family can be an enormous decision. While it may feel initially like admitting defeat, failure or weakness, in truth choosing family counseling can be a sign of strength. Perhaps Wayne Parker said it best in his blog post entitled “When Do I Need a Family Counselor?” posted on The Spruce back in March 2017, when he suggested that one should think of family counseling as adding additional tools to your family’s relationship and coping toolbox. You can learn new ways to communicate effectively, examine and adhere to your values, to work through challenges together, and disciplines which will help you relate to each other.

Wayne went on to say that if your family is experiencing and of the following symptoms, it may be time to consider engaging the services of a qualified professional marriage and family therapist.

  • Family members have difficulty functioning in their normal capacity. Do you feel an “energy drain” in your family? Things that used to be routine and normal are now burdensome?
  • Family members tend to have extreme emotional reactions. Do members of your family exhibit excessive anger, fear, sadness, depression or other emotional reactions?
  • There is a significant breakdown in communication between family members. Do you find it harder to communicate than usual? Are you experiencing the “silent treatment” more often than usual?
  • Family members are withdrawing from family life. Is there a new pattern of one or more family members going into seclusion?
  • There are symptoms of violence or the threat of violence to oneself or other family members. Beyond normal “horseplay,” do you feel that violence is a problem? Is there behavior that would be considered “assault” if it weren’t between family members?
  • Family members express feelings of helplessness or hopelessness. Do you feel that you have reached the end of your rope? Is coping with the stresses just too much to bear? Do you wonder if your family will ever recover?
  • There have been changes in the children’s behavior at home or school. Are grades taking a nosedive? What about attendance problems or disruptive behavior at school? Is one of the children out of control at home?
  • The family has had a traumatic experience by way of the diagnosis. Are family members are having a hard time coping or difficulty adjusting to the new reality while on the treatment journey?
  • Family members have substance abuse problems. Are there challenges with alcohol or drug use? Is there a family member with an eating disorder?

Many families who have gone through the treatment journey have expressed that therapy or counseling has helped them gain perspective, remain effective at work and even helped the family grow closer together emotionally.

Stay tuned for our follow-up blog post entitled “Help!  I need somebody…” where we will share insights related to how to interview and select the right counselor or therapist for you and your family while on the journey of care.

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/

or on email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

References used for this blog post:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freudian-sip/201102/how-find-the-best-therapist-you

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/choose-therapist.aspx

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/how-to-find-therapist#1

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/smarter-living/how-to-find-the-right-therapist.html?mcubz=3

https://www.thespruce.com/when-do-i-need-family-counselor-1270709

Quiet Warrior Next Door

5 things you may not know about your friend or family member who cares for a chronically ill child

Amazing advances in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic illness in children and adolescents have changed drastically in recent years. Diseases that were once fatal are now effectively treated and children survive at much higher rates than just a few years ago. Today, as a result of this tremendous progress, millions of children and adolescents in the United States now live with chronic illnesses and medical conditions including diabetes, cancer, neurofibromatosis, sickle cell disease, asthma, and chronic pain. A second order result of this progress is that more and more parents and families are confronted with chronic stress related to caring for their children on the long and difficult treatment journey.

5 things you may not know about your friend or family member who cares for a chronically ill child:

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms are experienced in 30-40% of parents with children who have cancer within six months of their diagnosis 1,2  That’s right… PTSD is normally associated with wounded combat veterans but parents and children on the long hard chronic illness treatment journey suffer terribly when dealing with similar symptoms.
  2. They are nearly twice as likely to report symptoms of burnout. 40-60% of parents with chronically ill children report symptoms burnout of syndrome, as expressed by symptoms such as emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, listlessness, tension and cognitive difficulties.3
  3. Some good news perhaps? The divorce rate amongst parents with children diagnosed with cancer is no higher than the rest of us married folk.4  Albeit this study was conducted in Norway which may not be reflective of results in other parts of the world.
  4. 27% of parents caring for children with chronic illness like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia relocated residences in many cases out of necessity or financial hardship5
  5. 68% of parents decreased work hours and 46% of those parents who have decrease their work hours either quit or lose their jobs5

These illnesses and their treatment, present children and their parents with significant sources of chronic stress that can cause many challenges beyond the illness they battle including emotional and behavioral problems. Furthermore, many pediatric illnesses are exacerbated by stress encountered in other facets of children’s lives like school, extracurricular activities, and changes in relationships with friends, etc. It is therefore essential to understand the ways that children, adolescents and adults cope with stress to better illuminate processes of adaptation to illness and to develop effective strategies to enhance coping and adjustment while on this journey.

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Nothing prepares us for parenthood. There is no manual; there is no training commensurate with the commitment of being a parent and there is no required license. Parents want to protect their children, keep them safe and watch them grow into productive, happy adults with rich full lives. It can be particularly devastating to learn that your child has a chronic illness such as diabetes, cancer, neurofibromatosis, juvenile arthritis or any of the other chronic illnesses that comprises the very long list of such conditions that will have a large unpredictable impact on your child, your family and your future.

When on the journey of caring for a chronically ill child it is all too easy to forget about the importance of self-care. This is why it is important to seek and accept help. The best place to start is at your hospital’s Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care. Leveraging the expertise of professionals when on this journey can save families time, reduce frustration and give them access to resources and information that can be difficult to find without help. With information, support, and talking about their experience, most children and families are able to cope with the stress related to the extraordinary demands placed upon them during their journey of care.

About the author

Tom Nieman is a Founder and President of The LIV Foundation and a financial services industry veteran. The best place to reach Tom is on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomnieman/   or on email at tommynieman@gmail.com

If you want to learn more, need help or know someone who needs help check out the following resources:

Caregiver Action Network: http://www.caregiveraction.org/

Family Voices: http://www.familyvoices.org/

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities: http://www.nichcy.org

The National Cancer Institute: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/coping/caregiver-support/parents

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Department of Social Work and Spiritual Care: http://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/social-work-and-spiritual-care/about

The LIV Foundation: http://www.thelivfoundation.org/

References to research:

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Parents of Children With Cancer Within Six Months of Diagnosis: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4243458/
  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in families of adolescent childhood cancer survivors: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15131138
  3. Increase Prevalence of burnout symptoms in parents of chronically ill children (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/38088120_Increase_Prevalence_of_burnout_symptoms_in_parents_of_chronically_ill_children
  4. Child’s cancer does not raise divorce risk: Reuters Article written by Amy Norton that references a broad study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, online December 28, 2009. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-cancer-divorce-idUSTRE6073GA20100108
  5. Family Life Events in the First Year of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Therapy: A Children’s Oncology Group Report: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4282930/